Founders on Health Care

Washington, Jefferson, Adams and Madison were for a very limited federal government and would almost certainly have been against the affordable health care act. They were also against the abolition of slavery.

The founding fathers were very smart, extremely well educated and steeped in the philosophies of the enlightenment but they seldom agreed with each other and it is highly unlikely that they would agree wholeheartedly with either the modern Republicans or the Democrats.

Tommy by Kipling

Sometimes the only thing that ever changes is the date:

Rudyard Kipling wrote the this poem “Tommy” in support of war veterans and their families and as a protest against the neglect of their ungrateful government and some of their unthinking countrymen.

Note: Tommy Atkins is akin to America’s GI Joe or the Australian digger. He was the generic name for lower rank English soldiers.

Tommy

I went into a public-‘ouse to get a pint o’ beer,
The publican ‘e up an’ sez, “We serve no red-coats here.”
The girls be’ind the bar they laughed an’ giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an’ to myself sez I:
O it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, go away”;
But it’s “Thank you, Mister Atkins”, when the band begins to play,
The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
O it’s “Thank you, Mister Atkins”, when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but ‘adn’t none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-‘alls,
But when it comes to fightin’, Lord! they’ll shove me in the stalls!
For it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, wait outside”;
But it’s “Special train for Atkins” when the trooper’s on the tide,
The troopship’s on the tide, my boys, the troopship’s on the tide,
O it’s “Special train for Atkins” when the trooper’s on the tide.

Yes, makin’ mock o’ uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an’ they’re starvation cheap;
An’ hustlin’ drunken soldiers when they’re goin’ large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin’ in full kit.
Then it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, ‘ow’s yer soul?”
But it’s “Thin red line of ‘eroes” when the drums begin to roll,
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it’s “Thin red line of ‘eroes” when the drums begin to roll.

We aren’t no thin red ‘eroes, nor we aren’t no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An’ if sometimes our conduck isn’t all your fancy paints,
Why, single men in barricks don’t grow into plaster saints;
While it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Tommy, fall be’ind”,
But it’s “Please to walk in front, sir”, when there’s trouble in the wind,
There’s trouble in the wind, my boys, there’s trouble in the wind,
O it’s “Please to walk in front, sir”, when there’s trouble in the wind.

You talk o’ better food for us, an’ schools, an’ fires, an’ all:
We’ll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don’t mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow’s Uniform is not the soldier-man’s disgrace.
For it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ “Chuck him out, the brute!”
But it’s “Saviour of ‘is country” when the guns begin to shoot;
An’ it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ anything you please;
An’ Tommy ain’t a bloomin’ fool — you bet that Tommy sees!

Rudyard Kipling

Dogma

The noun “dogma” was introduced into English around 1600 from the Latin “dogma” which meant “philosophical tenet” and was itself nicked from the Greek “dogmatos” meaning opinion or tenet. Dogma literally meant “that which one thinks is true.”

The modern meaning of dogma has evolved to mean “a principle or set of principles laid down by some authority as incontrovertibly true”.

The Greek origin of the word dogma reminds English speakers that currently established principals and doctrines were once simply thoughts and opinions, of ordinary people more or less like us, which gradually gained acceptance into the universal consciousness of society.

Nothing is incontrovertibly true and everything is open to discussion. Even Something seemingly written in stone was written by someone and that someone was likely imperfect and fallible.

Dogma

The noun “dogma” was introduced into English around 1600 from the Latin “dogma” which meant “philosophical tenet” and was itself nicked from the Greek “dogmatos” meaning opinion or tenet. Dogma literally meant “that which one thinks is true.”

The modern meaning of dogma has evolved to mean “a principle or set of principles laid down by some authority as incontrovertibly true”.

The Greek origin of the word dogma reminds English speakers that currently established principals and doctrines were once simply thoughts and opinions, of ordinary people more or less like us, which gradually gained acceptance into the universal consciousness of society.

Nothing is incontrovertibly true and everything is open to discussion. Even Something seemingly written in stone was written by someone and that someone was likely imperfect and fallible.